[dehai-news] (SIDA - Sweden) Managing aid exit and transformation: lessons from Bostwana, Eritrea, India, Malawi and South Africa synthesis report


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From: Biniam Haile \(SWE\) (eritrea.lave@comhem.se)
Date: Tue Nov 11 2008 - 15:35:08 EST


http://www.eldis.org/go/display
<http://www.eldis.org/go/display&type=Document&id=40784>
&type=Document&id=40784
 
Managing aid exit and transformation: lessons from Botswana, Eritrea,
India, Malawi and South Africa synthesis report
 
How can 'aid exit' be successfully managed?
 
Authors: A. Slob; A.M. Jerve

Publisher: Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency , 2008
 
Full text of document (
http://www.sida.se/shared/jsp/download.jsp?f=SIDA46360en_Managing+Aid+Ex
it+and+Transformation+Lessons+from+Botswana%2C+Eritrea%2C+India%2C+Malaw
i+and+South+Africa+Synthesis+Re.pdf
<http://www.sida.se/shared/jsp/download.jsp?f=SIDA46360en_Managing+Aid+E
xit+and+Transformation+Lessons+from+Botswana%2C+Eritrea%2C+India%2C+Mala
wi+and+South+Africa+Synthesis+Re.pdf&a=41360> &a=41360 )
 

A key part of the donor-recipient aid relationship is managing 'aid
exit'. This is to ensure the continuing sustainability of development
programmes and a positive effect on the 'post-aid' relationship.
However, due to a lack of research on the subject there is little scope
to explore 'best practice' in such a sensitive process.
 
However, in what the authors claim to be the first study of its kind,
this paper, offers a detailed analysis of 14 'aid exits', considering:
 
exit from a graduating country that remains an important bilateral
partner for a donor (i.e. South Africa and India)
 
exit from a graduating country that is a less important bilateral
partner for a donor (i.e. Botswana)
 
exit from a poor, aid-dependent country with a relatively limited number
of donors (i.e. Malawi)
 
exit from a fragile country or a country in conflict (i.e. Eritrea).
The authors offer a number of findings/conclusions including -
 
planning for exit and handing over of donor-supported programmes that
focuses on impact
and sustainability of development results is the exception rather than
the rule
 
in aid-dependent countries, where public institutions could no longer
deliver services to the population initially provided by donor-funded
activities, clear negative consequences for the beneficiaries were
observed. This intensified with shorter phase out periods.
 
in graduated countries, where aid is less important and the national
authorities took over the financing of development activities initially
funded by donors, major negative consequences were not reported. The aid
exit sometimes had a positive consequence in enhancing local ownership
and led to expansion of the activities started by the donor
 
despite the principles of partnership and mutuality, which were
formulated in the Paris Declaration of 2005, all exit decisions studied
proved to be unilateral decisions - mainly taken by donors and only in
the case of India taken by the partner country
 
successful exits typically involved a mix of realistic timeframes,
careful and mutual planning, consultation, and flexibility to set up
arrangements for handing over or find alternative ways of financing.
 
 

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