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Join The Conversation this year

Posted by: The Conversation Global highlights

Date: Friday, 05 January 2024

Dinosaurs, wolves and the world's most famous shark ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌

Happy new year from The Conversation’s international network. At least twice a week in 2024, this newsletter will publish digests of some of the best content produced by leading scholars working with our team of editors around the globe. Here, and on the international home page, you can keep abreast of academic research that is shaping our understanding of the world, as well as informed analysis of key events.

Signing up for this free newsletter is the ideal way for everyone to listen to and read valuable, and fascinating, academic research. So please, do forward this to friends and colleagues and encourage them to “join The Conversation”. It’s the perfect new year’s resolution.

Stephen Khan

Global Executive Editor, The Conversation

Nadezda Murmakova via Shutterstock

Wolves return to Europe: what to do about them is a people problem – podcast

Gemma Ware, The Conversation

More Europeans are having to learn how to live alongside predators again. Listen to The Conversation Weekly podcast.

Two hurdles mRNA drugs face are a short half-life and impurities that trigger immune responses. BlackJack3D/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Drugs of the future will be easier and faster to make, thanks to mRNA – after researchers work out a few remaining kinks

Li Li, UMass Chan Medical School

The COVID-19 pandemic demonstrated the promise of using mRNA as medicine. But before mRNA drugs can go beyond vaccines, researchers need to identify the right diseases to treat.

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We used AI and satellite imagery to map ocean activities that take place out of sight, including fishing, shipping and energy development

Jennifer Raynor, University of Wisconsin-Madison

A new study reveals that 75% of the world’s industrial fishing vessels are hidden from public view.

 
 
 
 

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